January 19, 2022

This Is How The Effect Of Vaccine Claims Is Decided – The Corona Vaccine: The Effect of Vaccine Claims


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Pharma company Pfizer and Biotech have described their Kovid-19 vaccine as 95 percent effective in protecting against corona virus. Moderna rated 94.5 percent, Estrogenica 90 percent and Sputnik rated their vaccine 90 percent effective.

Many other things are also necessary for vaccine success
Secondly, most experts were expecting these vaccines to be 50 to 70 percent effective. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was willing to certify the vaccine for emergency use even at 50 percent efficacy. In such a case, are the claims made on the basis of tests by pharmaceutical companies accurate? What does it mean Many such questions are coming to the mind of the citizens suffering from the epidemic.

These vaccines are expected to be released in the next few weeks. If the claims of the companies are true, then it seems that 100 people will get the vaccine. 90 to 95 of them will not be affected by the corona virus. But tests, statistics don’t really work like that. How effective the vaccine will be in the real world is determined by many things.

Meaning to be 95 percent effective?
Nearly 100 years ago, scholars of numbers formulated vaccine testing rules. Studies under these give the actual vaccine to some people involved in the test and some to the placebo ie artificial vaccine. They see how many people got sick in which group. Pfizer tested 48,661 people, of which 170 received Kovid-19 symptoms.

Of these, only eight received the original vaccine and the remaining 162 were placebo. Based on this difference, the company considered the vaccine to be 95 percent effective. But non-symptomatic infected are not included in this figure. That is, it cannot be said that if a person gets vaccinated then how likely will he be to get Kovid-19?

Remain alert even after vaccination
According to Yale University Professor David Pal Tell, vaccine does not save lives Vaccination campaigns save lives. Even after vaccination, care should not be taken to apply mask and social distance for some time. Vaccines will be effective only when they reach citizens on a large scale.

Pharma company Pfizer and Biotech have described their Kovid-19 vaccine as 95 percent effective in protecting against corona virus. Moderna rated 94.5 percent, Estrogenica 90 percent and Sputnik rated their vaccine 90 percent effective.

Many other things are also necessary for vaccine success

Secondly, most experts were expecting these vaccines to be 50 to 70 percent effective. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was willing to certify the vaccine for emergency use even at 50 percent efficacy. In such a case, are the claims made on the basis of tests by pharmaceutical companies accurate? What does it mean Many such questions are coming to the mind of the citizens suffering from the epidemic. These vaccines are expected to be released in the next few weeks. If the claims of the companies are true, then it seems that 100 people will get the vaccine. 90 to 95 of them will not be affected by the corona virus. But tests, statistics don’t really work like that. How effective the vaccine will be in the real world is determined by many things.

Meaning to be 95 percent effective?
Nearly 100 years ago, scholars of numbers formulated vaccine testing rules. Studies under these give the actual vaccine to some people involved in the test and some to the placebo ie artificial vaccine. They see how many people got sick in which group. Pfizer tested 48,661 people, of which 170 received Kovid-19 symptoms.

Of these, only eight received the original vaccine and the remaining 162 were placebo. Based on this difference, the company considered the vaccine to be 95 percent effective. But non-symptomatic infected are not included in this figure. That is, it cannot be said that if a person gets vaccinated then how likely will he be to get Kovid-19?

Remain alert even after vaccination
According to Yale University Professor David Pal Tell, vaccine does not save lives Vaccination campaigns save lives. Even after vaccination, care should not be taken to apply mask and social distance for some time. Vaccines will be effective only when they reach citizens on a large scale.


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